7/16/14 News Release: EPA Promises Action to Address Evaporation of PCBs from “Toxic Mound” on GM Superfund Site in Massena

19 Jul

News Release
7/16/14 For Immediate Release

Donald L. Hassig
Director, Cancer Action NY
315.262.2456
_______________________________________________________________

EPA Promises Action to Address Evaporation of PCBs from “Toxic Mound”
on GM Superfund Site in Massena

On 7/15/14, scientists and technical personnel employed by the US
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) participated in a Cancer Action
NY teleconference for discussion of minimization of PCB exposure
associated with the General Motors Powertrain Superfund Site in the
Town of Massena, New York. EPA empoyees on the call included: Larisa
Romanowski, Anne Kelly, Joel Singerman, Douglas Fisher, Marian Olsen,
PhD and Michael McGowan.

Discussion centered upon PCB evaporation from the Industrial Landfill
referred to by Akwesasne residents as the “Toxic Mound”. Anne Kelly
stated that EPA planned to remove the most heavily contaminated
materials from the Industrial Landfill and the East Disposal Area,
consolidate the remaining materials and then place a permanent cap
over the area. Ms. Kelly explained that the new cap is designed to
prevent all evaporation of PCBs.

Respiratory PCB exposure has significantly contributed to the
causation of diabetes on the Akwesasne Reserve. This has been clearly
elucidated by the research of David O. Carpenter, MD. “Capping areas
of PCB contamination so as to prevent all evaporation is a critical
part of minimizing ongoing exposure to these harmful chemicals. Where
any PCBs remain on the GM Superfund Site there must be effective
capping. Air quality monitoring must be utilized to insure that
capping stops PCBs from escaping containment.”-Donald L. Hassig

7/1/14 Letter to Katie Strack Director Franklin County Public Health Department Concerning Providing Information on Subject of PCB and Total POPs Exposure Minimization

2 Jul

7/1/14

Katie Strack, Director
Franklin County Public Health Department
Malone, NY USA

Dear Director Strack,

Cancer Action NY currently conducts an educational outreach on the
subject of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exposure minimization.
Since the founding of the organization in January 2000, we have
educated on carcinogen exposure reduction. We began with a focus on
reducing dioxin exposure and later expanded our outreach to address
minimization of all POPs exposures.

POPs are contaminants of all animal fats. They are present in all
animal fat containing foods, including: meats, fish, diary products,
eggs and processed foods in which animal fat is used as an ingredient.

I have gone door to door on the Akwesasne Reserve and in the Village
of Massena. The residents of these communities are unaware of POPs
contamination of the mainstream food supply. Some people are
knowledgeable concerning the presence of PCBs in fresh water fish and
certain wild game. Having only this limited knowledge people continue
to consume animal fat containing foods and receive ongoing exposures
to POPs.

In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) published “Persistent
Organic Pollutants: Impact on Child Health”. This landmark public
health protection report recommends action to minimize the exposure
that children receive to POPs. Populations residing in the vicinity
of POPs contaminated sites are prioritized for action. The population
residing at Akwesasne is such a population due to the presence of PCB
contaminated sites upwind and upstream of the reserve.

Considering the long history of PCB exposures on the Akwesasne
Reserve, POPs exposure minimization is of critical importance to
resident health. I would like to speak with you for twenty minutes
about the WHO report named above and POPs exposure minimization
education. The people of Akwesasne must be warned about the POPs
exposure health hazard constituted by the presence of POPs in the
animal fat containing foods of the mainstream food supply. I am
hopeful that once you have read this report and entered into a
dialogue on the subject of POPs exposure minimization education you
will be interested in working to create an educational outreach on this
subject within the Franklin County Public Health Department.

Thank you for your attention to this correspondence.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig

6/17/14 Letter to Congressman William Owens Concerning Publication of “ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Toxicity” and POPs Exposure Minimization Education

17 Jun

6/17/14

Hon. William Owens
US House of Representatives
Washington, DC USA

Dear Congressman Owens,

I would like to receive your assistance with motivating Dr. Michael Hatcher of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to participate on a conference call to discuss persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exposure minimization education. Please see below my letter to Dr. Hatcher.

The ATSDR has recently published an education piece titled, “ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Toxicity”. This document falls far short of using scientific knowledge to protect public health. It contains no warning to the public of damages to health caused by PCB exposures of a magnitude imposed by current and past levels of food supply contamination. Scientific knowledge supports the conclusion that such damages have occurred and continue to occur. Action on PCB exposure minimization is warranted.

The publication of the document named above causes me concern that ATSDR will choose not to warn the public of harm associated with current and past levels of POPs contamination of the mainstream food supply. The discussion that I am requesting with Dr. Hatcher is very much in order.

Thank you for your attention to this correspondence.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig
______________________________________________________________________________

6/17/14

Dr. Michael Hatcher
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, GA USA

Dear Dr. Hatcher,

I have read the document titled, “ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Toxicity”. The document states that consumption of contaminated animal fats is the main PCB exposure route for the general public. However, it does not warn that this food consumption exposure is likely to be causing serious harm to the health of members of the general public. Due to this lack of content, the document falls short of serving to provide
the public with the best available information on minimizing exposure to a harmful group of chemicals.

The scientific literature presents information supporting the conclusion that damage to human health occurs at the level of exposure imposed by past and current levels of food supply contamination. This is clearly the case with PCB exposure and cancer. Additionally, animal studies demonstrate epigenetic effects including cancer and reproductive problems. Researchers believe that similar epigenetic effects are occurring in humans.

The document in question states that harm to reproductive health and cognition have been demonstrated for the offspring of mothers who consumed large quantities of locally caught PCB contaminated fish. The people of Akwesasne and non-Indian residents of the St. Lawrence River valley can benefit from the information in this education piece. It provides them with the knowledge that they may have been harmed by PCBs if their mothers consumed large quantities of locally caught fish. This group of people and the members of the general public need to have information that will help them minimize their ongoing exposure to PCBs and the other persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

I am hopeful that the National Center for Environmental Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) will commence an effort to educate the general public on the subject of POPs exposure minimization. Such educational outreach is the responsibility of the National Center for Environmental Health and the ATSDR.

Pursuant to moving forward with educational outreach on the subject of POPs exposure minimization, I request that you speak with me and several of my associates. Please let me know when you would be available to join us on a conference call.

Thank you for your attention to this correspondence.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig

6/17/14 Letter to Dr. Michael Hatcher ATSDR Concerning “ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Toxicity”

17 Jun

6/17/14

Dr. Michael Hatcher
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, GA USA

Dear Dr. Hatcher,

I have read the document titled, “ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Toxicity”. The document states that consumption of contaminated animal fats is the main PCB exposure route for the general public. However, it does not warn that this food consumption exposure is likely to be causing serious harm to the health of members of the general public. Due to this lack of content, the document falls short of serving to provide
the public with the best available information on minimizing exposure to a harmful group of chemicals.

The scientific literature presents information supporting the conclusion that damage to human health occurs at the level of exposure imposed by past and current levels of food supply contamination. This is clearly the case with PCB exposure and cancer. Additionally, animal studies demonstrate epigenetic effects including cancer and reproductive problems. Researchers believe that similar epigenetic effects are occurring in humans.

The document in question states that harm to reproductive health and cognition have been demonstrated for the offspring of mothers who consumed large quantities of locally caught PCB contaminated fish. The people of Akwesasne and non-Indian residents of the St. Lawrence River valley can benefit from the information in this education piece. It provides them with the knowledge that they may have been harmed by PCBs if their mothers consumed large quantities of locally caught fish. This group of people and the members of the general public need to have information that will help them minimize their ongoing exposure to PCBs and the other persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

I am hopeful that the National Center for Environmental Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) will commence an effort to educate the general public on the subject of POPs exposure minimization. Such educational outreach is the responsibility of the National Center for Environmental Health and the ATSDR.

Pursuant to moving forward with educational outreach on the subject of POPs exposure minimization, I request that you speak with me and several of my associates. Please let me know when you would be available to join us on a conference call.

Thank you for your attention to this correspondence.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig

6/16/14 News Release: ATSDR Publishes Education Piece on PCB Exposure and Damages to Health

17 Jun

ATSDR Publishes Education Piece on PCB Exposure and Damages to Health

During the course of the past several years Cancer Action NY has come
before local governments in St. Lawrence County to advocate for
efforts aimed at motivating the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention’s National Center for Environmental Health and Agency for
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to produce educational
materials on the subject of persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
exposure minimization. As a result of these endeavors the ATSDR
commenced an effort to produce an education piece on polychlorinated
biphenyls (PCBs). This document has now been finalized and is
available on the internet. It’s title is “ATSDR Case Studies in
Environmental Medicine Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Toxicity”. It
is part of the ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine series.
This educational material can be accessed at the URL found below.

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.html

The case study covers sources of exposure to PCBs and describes
certain damages to health associated with PCB exposure. The education
piece is not suitable to education on the subject of POPs exposure
minimization due to the fact that only PCBs are addressed.

The document states that consumption of contaminated animal fats is
the main PCB exposure route for the general public. However, it does
not warn that this food consumption exposure is likely to be causing
serious harm to the health of members of the general public. Due to
this lack of content, the document falls short of serving to provide
the public with the best available information on minimizing exposure
to a harmful group of chemicals.

The scientific literature presents information supporting the
conclusion that damage to human health occurs at the level of exposure
imposed by past and current levels of food supply contamination. This
is clearly the case with PCB exposure and cancer. Animal studies
demonstrate epigenetic effects including cancer and reproductive
deficits. Researchers believe that similar epigenetic effects are
occurring in humans. The only plausible explanation of the failure of
the ATSDR to include a warning about the harm caused to members of the
general public by PCB exposure imposed by the presence of PCBs in
animal fat foods of the mainstream food supply, including: meats,
fish, dairy products and eggs is pressure from the foods sector of the
economy.

The document states that harm to reproductive health and cognition
have been demonstrated for the offspring of mothers who consumed large
quantities of locally caught PCB contaminated fish. Thus, this
education piece would be useful for educating populations with a
history of heavy consumption of locally caught fish.

The people of Akwesasne and non-Indian residents of the St. Lawrence
River valley can benefit from the information in this education piece.
It provides them with the knowledge that they may have been harmed by
PCBs if their mothers consumed large quantities of locally caught
fish. This group of people and the members of the general public need
to have information that will help them minimize their ongoing
exposure to PCBs and the other POPs. Local St. Lawrence County
governments need to continue to advocate for action by the National
Center for Environmental Health and the ATSDR to educate on the
subject of POPs exposure minimization.

6/10/14 Letter to St. Lawrence County Policy Makers Concerning the Publication of “ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Toxicity”

17 Jun

6/10/14

Dear St. Lawrence County Policy Makers,

During the course of the past several years Cancer Action NY has come
to local government in St. Lawrence County to advocate for efforts
aimed at motivating the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s
National Center for Environmental Health and Agency for Toxic
Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to produce educational
materials on the subject of persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
exposure minimization. As a result of these endeavors the ATSDR
commenced an effort to produce an education piece on polychlorinated
biphenyls (PCBs). This document has now been finalized and is
available on the internet. It’s title is “Polychlorinated Biphenyls
(PCBs) 2014″. It is part of the ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental
Medicine series. You can access the educational material at the URL
found below.

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.html

This document covers sources of exposure to PCBs and describes damages
to reproductive health and cognition associated with PCB exposure.
The education piece is not suitable to education on the subject of
POPs exposure minimization due to the fact that only PCBs are
addressed.

The document makes known the fact that the main PCB exposure route for
the general public is consumption of contaminated animal fats.
However, it does not contain a warning that food consumption exposure
is likely to be causing serious harm to the health of members of the
general public. Due to this lack of content, the document falls short
of serving to provide the public with the best available information
on minimizing exposure to a harmful group of chemicals.

This document is only useful for educating populations with a history
of having consumed large quantities of locally caught fish. The
document states that harm to reproductive health and cognition have
been demonstrated for populations with this fish consumption history.
Offspring of mothers who consumed large quantities of locally caught
fish were most affected.

The scientific literature describes damages to the health of the
general public that are associated with PCB exposure at past and
current levels of food supply contamination. The only plausible
explanation of the failure of the ATSDR to include a warning about the
harm caused to members of the general public by PCB exposure imposed
by the presence of PCBs in animal fat foods of the mainstream food
supply, including: meats, fish, diary products and eggs is pressure
from the foods sector of the economy.

The people of Akwesasne and non-Indian residents of the St. Lawrence
River valley can benefit from the information in this education piece.
It provides them with the knowledge that they may have been harmed by
PCBs if their mothers consumed large quantities of locally caught
fish. This group of people and the members of the general public need
to have information that will help them minimize their ongoing
exposure to PCBs and the other POPs. Local St. Lawrence County
governments need to continue to advocate for action by the National
Center for Environmental Health and the ATSDR to educate on the
subject of POPs exposure minimization.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig

5/5/14 Media Advisory: David O. Carpenter MD and the St. Lawrence County Legislature Can Prevent Cancer, Diabetes and Heart Disease by Providing Public with Information on POPs

4 May

David O. Carpenter MD and the St. Lawrence County Legislature Can
Prevent Cancer, Diabetes and Heart Disease by Providing Public with
Information on POPs

Monday, May 5, 2014, 7:00 PM

St. Lawrence County Courthouse, Canton, New York USA

At the May meeting of the St. Lawrence County Legislature, I will make
a public forum presentation on the power of scientific knowledge and
public health messaging to prevent cancer, diabetes and heart disease.
David O. Carpenter, MD, Director of the State University of New York
University at Albany Institute for Health and the Environment is an
internationally recognized expert on persistent organic pollutants
(POPs) exposure and damages to health. He is prepared to share his
knowledge with the members of the St. Lawrence County Legislature.
Once Dr. Carpenter has provided our county leaders with his powerful
assistance in comprehending the benefits of public educational
outreach on the subject of POPs exposure minimization, it will be the
responsibility of the St. Lawrence County Legislature to task the
Public Health Department with the work of conducting outreach on this
subject. Informed St. Lawrence County residents can begin making
choices in the supermarket that reduce the quantities of POPs in their
bodies, thereby reducing their risk of developing POPs exposure
associated diseases.

The health protection knowledge exists. The scientist who has that
knowledge is prepared to share it. All that is needed is an
invitation to make his presentation. It will be a very good day in
St. Lawrence County when Legislator James Bunstone gives this
invitation to David O. Carpenter, MD. Taking steps on the path of
using scientific knowledge to prevent disease is a most honorable
endeavor.

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